I Love Science

Weekly Science Links Pt. 4

In this week’s “Science Links” post I share a number of articles covering topics ranging from a man with an artificial heart surviving for 555 days, to NASA’s move to create a fully electric x-plane, to giant holes produced by methane opening up in the Siberian permafrost, a clear sign of accelerating climate change. There are also several tech and industry news articles covering topics such as Microsoft’s foray into blockchain technology and Google’s latest plan to deliver gigabit broadband to consumers. Enjoy!

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Current vs PETM temperature change

A Scary Prediction: Catastrophic Climate Change

Today’s prediction is unfortunately a gloomy one. I predict that there will be one (or more) climate shocks that will likely accelerate the warming of the planet beyond what is already anticipated. Related to this would be a dramatic loss of biodiversity in the oceans due to the acidifying of oceans, coral bleaching and overfishing.

Our planet is/was in natural equilibrium when it came to global temperatures. Now it seems the equilibrium has been disturbed by manmade activity. The signs are that our current models are too conservative and have not sufficiently accounted for the effect of methane – a greenhouse gas 25 times worse than CO2 – being released from melting permafrost and the possibility of reaching a tipping point / feedback loop situation.

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A Bold Prediction: (Almost) Free Energy in 20 Years

Today is the second of my “Prediction Saturday” blog posts. The intent of my “Prediction Saturday” posts are to put forward bold predictions about the near future, e.g. 15 – 20 years from now. These tie into the sci-fi novella that I am writing, “2030 ET: Tribulation.” Today I make a bold prediction regarding the future of energy. The prediction is that over the next 20 years, the price of oil will crash as demand for oil will virtually be non-existent. The energy revolution will happen as we learn to efficiently exploit the only fusion reactor that matters, the Sun. Advancements in 3D printing, materials science, and bioengineering will drop the cost per kilowatt of solar and biofuel energy close to zero.

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Probability Robots will Take Your Job

Prediction: The Inevitability of Unconditional Basic Income

Today is the first of my “Prediction Saturday Series” posts. I intend to use these posts to put forward a prediction about the near future, e.g. 15 – 20 years from now.

My prediction for this week is the inevitability of an unconditional basic income; that is, that everyone will be paid a subsistence wage by the government irrespective of whether they work or not.

Tomorrow (June 5th, 2016), will be the first test of my prediction when the citizens of Switzerland will vote on providing an unconditional 2,500 Swiss Franks a month (about the same amount in US Dollars) to each of its citizens, regardless of work, wealth or their social contribution. Opinion polls suggest the referendum will be heavily defeated, and my prediction will not hold up at the first test. That is perfectly understandable as the conditions are not right for unconditional basic income as yet; but in 15 – 20 years’ time, they will be.

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I Love Science

Weekly Science Links Pt. 2

In my ”Weekly Science Links” post from earlier in the week, I shared some of my favorite sources of science news and analysis. Another tip is to subscribe to science news letters. I subscribe to a series of newsletters from “Seeking Alpha” which provide cutting edge (i.e. first thing in the morning daily; fresh) news and analysis on salient business topics. One of the newsletters covers technology (the “Eye on Tech” newsletter). Interestingly, this newsletter designed for Wall Street investors, is one of the best newsletters I have found to stay ahead of near term technology trends as they are deployed and brought to market (over the next few years).

This week’s (second) edition of Science Links features several articles from the Seeking Alpha “Eye on Tech” newsletter, which is authored by Eric Jhonsa. I would like to attributed the summaries to him as they are paraphrased from the newsletter. The graphics are also attributed to the newsletter and/or the linked articles (the original source material for Eric).

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I Love Science

Weekly Science Links

I’ve been following science news online for as long as I’ve been on the Internet so that means going back to the late ‘90s. Offline, if we count children’s fact books and my parents Nature magazines, NatGeo, etc. I’ve been reading up on science since I was 5 years old.

Currently, I read about 15 – 20 science related articles every week online from a variety of sources. I also rely on the excellent links that people post on Twitter, Facebook, etc. In other words, I crowdsource my science! In that same spirit, I have decided to share my best science links for the week with you.

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